Generic Lambdas and the compose Function

I am about two thirds through Scott Meyers’ Effective Modern C++, and I have discovered the power of generic lambdas. Actually I had read about generic lambdas before in the Wikipedia entry on C++14, but that was far from enough for me to get it—and I was not smart enough to investigate deeper. Anyway, Item 33 in Effective Modern C++ gives enough examples to show me the power, and it is exactly the tool I need to solve the problems in my compose function.

Let me start from my (poor) exclamation in my last blog:

Alas, a lambda is only a function, but not a type-deducing function template.

Wrong, wrong, wrong! The generic lambda is exactly what I claimed it was not.

Type deduction was the problem that caused my compose function template to fail. Recall its definition and the failure case:

template <typename Tp>
auto compose()
{
    return apply<Tp>;
}

template <typename Tp, typename Fn, typename... Fargs>
auto compose(Fn fn, Fargs... args)
{
    return [=](Tp&& x) -> decltype(auto)
    {
        return fn(compose<Tp>(args...)(forward<Tp>(x)));
    };
}

…
Obj obj(0);
auto const op_nr = compose<Obj>(clone);
test(op_nr(obj));

The error was that obj, as an lvalue, could not be bound to Obj&& (on line 10). Although I tried to use the perfect forwarding pattern, it did not work, as there was no type deduction—Tp was specified by the caller. Why so? Because I thought a lambda could not be a type-deducing function template.

I won’t go into details about generic lambdas per se, of which you can get a lot of information in Scott’s book or by Google. Instead, I only want to show you that generic lambdas help solve the type deduction problem and give a function template to suit my needs.

Without further ado, I am showing you the improved version of compose that uses generic lambdas:

auto compose()
{
    return [](auto&& x) -> decltype(auto)
    {
        return forward<decltype(x)>(x);
    };
}

template <typename Fn, typename... Fargs>
auto compose(Fn fn, Fargs... args)
{
    return [=](auto&& x) -> decltype(auto)
    {
        return fn(compose(args...)(forward<decltype(x)>(x)));
    };
}

You can immediately notice the following:

  • The original template type parameter Tp is gone.
  • Tp&& is now changed to auto&&, allowing type deduction to work.
  • In order to make perfect forwarding work when the type of x is unknown, forward<decltype(x)> is used.

With this definition, We no longer need to differentiate between op_klvr, op_rvr, etc. No way to do so, anyway. Things are beautifully unified, until the moment you need to put it in an std::function. Run the code at the final listing to see their differences.

Although it already looks perfect, we have a bonus since we no longer specify Tp. We are no longer constrained by only one argument. A small change will make multiple arguments work:

auto compose()
{
    return [](auto&& x) -> decltype(auto)
    {
        return forward<decltype(x)>(x);
    };
}

template <typename Fn>
auto compose(Fn fn)
{
    return [=](auto&&... x) -> decltype(auto)
    {
        return fn(forward<decltype(x)>(x)...);
    };
}

template <typename Fn, typename... Fargs>
auto compose(Fn fn, Fargs... args)
{
    return [=](auto&&... x) -> decltype(auto)
    {
        return fn(
            compose(args...)(forward<decltype(x)>(x)...));
    };
}

The first compose function is no longer useful when we have at least one function passed to compose, but I am keeping it for now. The parameter pack plus the generic lambda makes a perfect combination here.

Finally, a code listing for you to play with is provided below (also available as test_compose.cpp in the zip file download for my last blog):

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

#define PRINT_AND_TEST(x)           \
    cout << " " << #x << ":\n  ";   \
    test(x);                        \
    cout << endl;

auto compose()
{
    return [](auto&& x) -> decltype(auto)
    {
        return forward<decltype(x)>(x);
    };
}

template <typename Fn>
auto compose(Fn fn)
{
    return [=](auto&&... x) -> decltype(auto)
    {
        return fn(forward<decltype(x)>(x)...);
    };
}

template <typename Fn, typename... Fargs>
auto compose(Fn fn, Fargs... args)
{
    return [=](auto&&... x) -> decltype(auto)
    {
        return fn(
            compose(args...)(forward<decltype(x)>(x)...));
    };
}

struct Obj {
    int value;
    explicit Obj(int n) : value(n)
    {
        cout << "Obj(){" << value << "} ";
    }
    Obj(const Obj& rhs) : value(rhs.value)
    {
        cout << "Obj(const Obj&){" << value << "} ";
    }
    Obj(Obj&& rhs) : value(rhs.value)
    {
        rhs.value = -1;
        cout << "Obj(Obj&&){" << value << "} ";
    }
    ~Obj()
    {
        cout << "~Obj(){" << value << "} ";
    }
};

void test(Obj& x)
{
    cout << "=> Obj&:" << x.value << "\n  ";
}

void test(Obj&& x)
{
    cout << "=> Obj&&:" << x.value << "\n  ";
}

void test(const Obj& x)
{
    cout << "=> const Obj&:" << x.value << "\n  ";
}

Obj clone(Obj x)
{
    cout << "=> clone(Obj):" << x.value << "\n  ";
    return x;
}

void test()
{
    Obj obj(0);
    cout << endl;

    auto const op = compose(clone);
    std::function<Obj(const Obj&)> fn_klvr = op;
    std::function<Obj(Obj&&)> fn_rvr = op;
    std::function<Obj(Obj)> fn_nr = op;
    PRINT_AND_TEST(op(obj));
    PRINT_AND_TEST(fn_klvr(obj));
    PRINT_AND_TEST(fn_nr(obj));
    cout << endl;
    PRINT_AND_TEST(op(Obj(1)));
    PRINT_AND_TEST(fn_klvr(Obj(1)));
    PRINT_AND_TEST(fn_rvr(Obj(1)));
    PRINT_AND_TEST(fn_nr(Obj(1)));
}

template <typename T1, typename T2>
auto sum(T1 x, T2 y)
{
    return x + y;
}

template <typename T1, typename T2, typename... Targ>
auto sum(T1 x, T2 y, Targ... args)
{
    return sum(x + y, args...);
}

template <typename T>
auto sqr(T x)
{
    return x * x;
}

int main()
{
    test();
    cout << endl;
    auto const op = compose(sqr<int>,
                            sum<int, int, int, int, int>);
    cout << op(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) << endl;
}

Happy hacking!

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